February 20, 2013

History of Mould

»Testing for Mould
»Water & Moisture

“Hey – what’s up with the word ‘mould’?!  Isn’t it supposed to be ‘mold’?”

We get asked about this all the time.  No – it’s really not a typo or sloppy spelling.  The term “mould” is the correct scientific term to describe fungi (mould, mildew, etc.).  The word “mold” means to shape; however, most Americans use this spelling when describing fungal growth.

Think of it this way – if you pour liquid Jello into a mold, and forget about it for a few weeks, you will see mould growth on your Jello.

“Is mould new?”

No, mould growth is not new!  In fact, from a Historical perspective, there is information regarding mould that is thousands of years old!

Leviticus 13:47-59 (NIV)

Regulations About Defiling Molds

47 “As for any fabric that is spoiled with a defiling mold—any woolen or linen clothing, 48 any woven or knitted material of linen or wool, any leather or anything made of leather— 49 if the affected area in the fabric, the leather, the woven or knitted material, or any leather article, is greenish or reddish, it is a defiling mold and must be shown to the priest. 50 The priest is to examine the affected area and isolate the article for seven days. 51 On the seventh day he is to examine it, and if the mold has spread in the fabric, the woven or knitted material, or the leather, whatever its use, it is a persistent defiling mold; the article is unclean. 52 He must burn the fabric, the woven or knitted material of wool or linen, or any leather article that has been spoiled; because the defiling mold is persistent, the article must be burned.

53 “But if, when the priest examines it, the mold has not spread in the fabric, the woven or knitted material, or the leather article, 54 he shall order that the spoiled article be washed. Then he is to isolate it for another seven days. 55 After the article has been washed, the priest is to examine it again, and if the mold has not changed its appearance, even though it has not spread, it is unclean. Burn it, no matter which side of the fabric has been spoiled. 56 If, when the priest examines it, the mold has faded after the article has been washed, he is to tear the spoiled part out of the fabric, the leather, or the woven or knitted material. 57 But if it reappears in the fabric, in the woven or knitted material, or in the leather article, it is a spreading mold; whatever has the mold must be burned. 58 Any fabric, woven or knitted material, or any leather article that has been washed and is rid of the mold, must be washed again. Then it will be clean.”

59 These are the regulations concerning defiling molds in woolen or linen clothing, woven or knitted material, or any leather article, for pronouncing them clean or unclean.

…interesting! So the Priests were the very first Indoor Air Quality professionals.

“Curse of the Pharaoh’s Tomb”

Recent studies of newly opened ancient Egyptian tombs that had not been exposed to modern contaminants found pathogenic bacteria of the Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas genera, and the moulds Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus.  Additionally, newly opened tombs often become roosts for bats, and bat guano may harbor histoplasmosis.  (http://www.ancient-origins.net/myths-legends/curse-tutankhamen-s-tomb-scientific-explanation-part-2-00747)

However, when in doubt, the utilization of the Holy Hand-grenade of Antioch will always suffice.
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOrgLj9lOwk)